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Justice Breyer, the fashion maven, makes a colleague swoon

WASHINGTON — A Supreme Court copyright dispute over cheerleading uniforms Monday brought out the fashion maven in Justice Stephen Breyer.

“The clothes on the hanger do nothing. The clothes on the woman do everything,” Breyer said during an argument about whether the design of cheerleading uniforms can be protected under copyright law.

Gov’t says colder weather will boost winter heating bills

Expect to pay more to heat your home this winter than you spent last year.

That’s the message from government analysts who sifted through forecasts for a colder winter and slightly higher energy prices.

The Energy Department said Thursday that household bills are likely to be higher for all four main heating fuels — natural gas, electricity, heating oil, and propane.

Growing up together, TV and baby boomers were a perfect fit

NEW YORK — Unlike baby boomers, television has no birth certificate.

TV’s arrival, depending on how you see it, can be marked at any of a number of moments in the last century.

Maybe 1927, when 21-year-old Philo Farnsworth transmitted the image of a horizontal line to a receiver in the next room of his San Francisco lab.

Mother uncovers lasting impact of baby son’s organ donation

WASHINGTON — An ultrasound showed one of Sarah Gray’s unborn twins was missing part of his brain, a fatal birth defect. His brother was born healthy but Thomas lived just six days. Latching onto hope for something positive to come from heartache, Gray donated some of Thomas’ tissue for scientific research his eyes, his liver, his umbilical cord blood.

Lucky’ to be alive: Calf with 2 faces born at Kentucky farm

CAMPBELLSVILLE, Ky. — Visitors to a central Kentucky farm may do a double-take when they see the newest addition: a two-faced calf.

Stan McCubbin of Campbellsville told WDRB-TV (http://bit.ly/2cT1RoQ) that he thought he had twins when he first saw the calf on Friday, but quickly realized he had something far more unusual.

The quest to end lost airline luggage

LINTHICUM, Md. — Victor DaRosa stands under a scorching afternoon sun, loading bags onto a jet heading to Detroit.

As each suitcase climbs up the conveyor belt into the plane, a small computer verifies that it actually belongs on that flight. If one bag didn’t, a red light would flash and the belt would stop until somebody acknowledges the mistake and reroutes the luggage.