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Fort Frances Times Online Edition - April 5, 2016

Classroom choir

Photos
Heather Latter

Michelle Cain’s Early Years class from Robert Moore School filled the gymnasium with their voices as they sang “Over the Rainbow” and “Be Kind to Your Web-Footed Friends” during the Rainy River District Festival of the Performing Arts this morning. Nicole Thomson’s Early Years class from J.W. Walker School placed first while Cain’s students took second.

Focus on sports tourism

News
Staff

How could sports and recreation help drive tourism here?

This topic will be the focus of a planning session hosted by the Rainy River Future Development Corp. next Wednesday (April 13) from 7-9 p.m. at the Copper River Inn.

Vocal division opens ‘Festival’

District
Press Release

The Rainy River District Festival of the Performing Arts opened with the Vocal division yesterday at Knox United Church, adjudicated by Sarah Hall, an adjunct professor of music at Brandon University in Manitoba.

Hall also will hold an informal vocal workshop tomorrow (April 8) at 7 p.m. at Knox United Church.

Digging in

Photos
Joey Payeur

Greg and Kayden Bruyere were part of the hungry crowd that dove into the delicious spaghetti meal provided by the FFHS First Responders during their fundraising dinner there Tuesday. The group is collecting funds to cover the cost of its trip to an EMS conference in Salt Lake City next year.

Autism walk a success

District
Richard Johnson
Falls Journal

About 100 people attended the inaugural Autism Support Walk on Saturday in International Falls.

The event recognized World Autism Awareness Day and Autism Awareness Month.

Participants, including Falls Mayor Bob Anderson, walked downtown and then, due to chilly temperatures, gathered at First Assembly of God Church.

Dress giveaway all set

District
Staff

Need a dress for prom or another special occasion?

Why not drop by “Curvy Chick” here this Saturday (April 9) for the third-annual dress giveaway.

Owner Jennifer Horton has been receiving donations of dresses for the past month in anticipation of the giveaway, which will take place from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. at 306 Scott St.

Lakers on verge of final

Sports
Staff

If the English River Miners are feeling something pressing against their backs today, chances are good it’s probably a wall.

The Miners are down to their last gasp after falling 5-1 to the Fort Frances Lakers last night at the Cochenour to trail 3-0 in their best-of-seven SIJHL semi-final series.

Kellar nets six goals

Sports
Staff

With over a month passing between games, Sara Kellar had plenty of pent-up energy to unleash—not to mention a stockpile of super shots.

Kellar racked up six goals as the La Place Rendez-Vous Rage doubled the Fine Foods Fury 8-4 in Borderland Women’s Indoor Soccer League action last night at Fort High.

Mulcair hoping to quiet critics

National
Kristy Kirkup
The Canadian Press

OTTAWA—Tom Mulcair, the man many are blaming for last year’s NDP collapse at the ballot box, will confront his critics this weekend in Edmonton, where rank-and-file party members are gathering to decide their leader’s political fate.

Lindros backs concussion bill

National
Allison Jones
The Canadian Press

By Allison Jones THE CANADIAN PRESS

TORONTO—Former NHL star Eric Lindros is lending some high-profile support to an Ontario private member’s bill on concussions that has become stalled.

Rowan’s Law is named for a 17-year-old girl from the Ottawa area who died after being injured while playing high school rugby.

Security of military bases under review

National
The Canadian Press

OTTAWA—The House of Commons’ defence committee will hold closed-door hearings on the state of security at Canadian military bases, The Canadian Press has learned.

Conservative MP James Bezan, the party’s defence critic, proposed the idea, which recently was accepted by the all-party committee, although a date for the investigation has yet to be scheduled.

B.C. town opts to toss straws

National
Tamsyn Burgmann
The Canadian Press

VANCOUVER—Some businesses in an ocean-side town on Vancouver Island are eliminating plastic drinking straws—taking a first slug against plastic waste.

Businesses in the tourist destination of Tofino have been asked to stop routinely handing out straws and to provide biodegradable options on request, said Michelle Hall, co-chair of a non-profit group that’s spearheading the campaign.

Age cut-off lowered for autism therapy

Health & Wellness
Allison Jones
The Canadian Press

TORONTO—Ontario children with autism aged five or older no longer qualify for government-funded intensive therapy—a move critics say is leaving many families in the lurch.

The Liberal government announced a new Ontario Autism Program with $333 million in funding, but changes include limiting Intensive Behavioural Intervention to children aged two-four.

Wings put dent in Flyers’ playoff hopes

Sports
Noah Trister
The Associated Press

DETROIT—If the Detroit Red Wings make the playoffs for a 25th-straight year, they can thank Jimmy Howard.

Howard made 30 saves, and Darren Helm, Andreas Athanasiou, and Kyle Quincey scored, as the Red Wings took a step toward another post-season appearance with a 3-0 win over the Philadelphia Flyers last night.

Padres set mark for futility

Sports
The Associated Press

SAN DIEGO—So much joy and so much agony in one game.

Japanese pitcher Kenta Maeda homered in the second at-bat of his debut with the L.A. Dodgers last night and beat the Padres 7-0—making San Diego the first team in major-league history to be shut out in its first three games.

“I’m just very happy that I got a ‘W’ in my major-league debut,” Maeda said through a translator.

Koe rink clinches first place

Sports
The Canadian Press

BASEL, Switzerland—Canada’s Kevin Koe clinched first place at the world men’s curling championship with a 6-4 win over Norway’s Thomas Ulsrud earlier today.

Koe now will play in tomorrow’s 1 vs. 2 Page playoff game for a chance to advance to Sunday’s final.

The Canadian rink had last-rock advantage to open their Draw 15 game, but had to settle for a single in the first end.

Cost of stealthy ships balloons

Technology
The Associated Press

BATH, Maine—The price tag for the most expensive destroyer built for the U.S. Navy still is growing.

Updated figures from the Congressional Research Service indicate the cost of three ships in the Zumwalt class has grown 3.7 percent, or $450 million, from the previous fiscal year.

That lifts the total for the three ships to $12.74 billion.

Cost of 3 stealthy destroyers grows by $450 million

Technology
The Associated Press

BATH, Maine — The price tag for the most expensive destroyer built for the U.S. Navy is still growing.

Updated figures from the Congressional Research Service indicate the cost of three ships in the Zumwalt class has grown 3.7 per cent, or $450 million, from the previous fiscal year. That lifts the total for the three ships to $12.74 billion.

FAA writing rules for commercial drone flights over people

Technology
By Joan Lowy The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Federal aviation officials said Wednesday they will work quickly on regulations that would permit small, commercial drones to fly over people and crowds.

Swiss weigh Muslims’ refusal to shake female teachers’ hands

International
By Jamey Keaten The Associated Press

GENEVA — A Swiss high school’s decision to accept two Muslim boys’ refusal for religious reasons to shake hands with their female teachers has triggered a debate in the small Alpine country, where handshake greetings have long been a gender-neutral tradition.

Scientists study survivors amid bats’ mass die-off

Science
Michael Hill
The Associated Press

ALTAMONT, N.Y.—As white-nose syndrome kills millions of bats across North America, there’s a glimmer of hope at hibernation spots where it first struck a decade ago.

Some bats in some caves are hanging on.

Scientists look at hangers-on amid mass die-off of bats

Science
By Michael Hill The Associated Press

ALTAMONT, N.Y. — As white-nose syndrome kills millions of bats across North America, there’s a glimmer of hope at hibernation spots where it first struck a decade ago: Some bats in some caves are hanging on.

Want a better Passover brisket? You need to know your cuts

Recipes
By Elizabeth Karmel The Associated Press

Though most of my brisket experience has been spent at the smoker or the grill, I have fond memories of braised brisket, which I usually enjoyed during Passover with my Jewish relatives.