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Fort Frances Times Online Edition - April 15, 2016

School speaker

Photos
Heather Latter

Brian Aspinall, a teacher and leader from Chatham, Ont., spoke about 21st-century education, assessment, and evaluation during the “We Learn Together” session yesterday at St. Francis School for teachers, parents, and students. Sponsored by the Catholic Parent Involvement Committee and the Northwest Catholic District School Board, a similar event was held at St.

More Festival results

District
Press Release

The Rainy River District Festival of the Performing Arts wrapped up its Drama division yesterday, adjudicated by Melanie Whyte, an actor and singing teacher currently living in Winnipeg.

Whyte adjudicated solo poetry and readings, as well as monologues, speeches, skits, readers’ theatres, and choral speaking.

McMahon honoured

District
Staff

Sheila McMahon, executive director of the United Native Friendship Centre here, is among 11 individuals and eight organizations who will receive the June Callwood Outstanding Achievement Award for Volunteerism from the province.

The award is to recognize commitment to volunteering and longstanding service to communities.

Digging it

Photos
Joey Payeur

Rebecca Armit from No Diggity got the lowdown on this passing play during the second set of the Fort Frances Women’s Volleyball League final last night at Fort High. The squad lost the best-of-five opener 3-1 and then the best-of-three finale 2-1 to How I Set Your Mother to give the regular-season champions the title.

Men’s hoops league final set

Sports
Staff

There won’t be one shade of grey, never mind 50, in what literally will be a “Black” and “White” affair.

Kevin Gemmell led the way with 16 points as Team White beat Team Red 58-46 in the semi-final of the Fort Frances Men’s Basketball League on Monday at Fort High.

Scheibler paces Muskies at meet

Sports
Staff

The OFSAA champion of a year ago doesn’t feel like he’s in mid-season form.

His medal count says otherwise.

Sekina Scheibler led the Muskies’ 17-member track-and-field team with six podium finishes in six events at the season-opening Bronco Booster Invite at Falls High School yesterday.

Up and over

Photos
Joey Payeur

Tory Beaudry of the Muskie track-and-field team eased her way through the air to clear the bar on this attempt during the girls’ high jump event at the season-opening Bronco Booster Invite yesterday at Falls High School. The Muskies collected 11 medals, with both the girls’ and boys’ teams finishing in fourth place in their respective divisions.

Bujold tops yet again

Sports
Staff

Setting goals is important.

Aaron Bujold makes reaching those goals look easy.

The Grade 10 member of the Muskie badminton team claimed his second-straight senior boys’ singles title at the NorWOSSA finals Wednesday in Atikokan.

“My goal was to go undefeated,” said Bujold, who went 4-0 to earn the crown against a field of players all older than him.

Lakers fall in opener to ’Dogs

Sports
Staff

That 12-game winning streak for the Lakers?

That season-long mastery of the Dryden GM Ice Dogs?

That home-ice advantage for the entire SIJHL playoffs?

Forget about all of it—just like the Lakers need to forget about last night as quickly as possible.

Robot finds ‘monster’ in depths of Loch Ness

National
The Associated Press

LONDON—An underwater robot exploring Loch Ness has discovered a dark, monster-shaped mass in its depths.

Disappointingly, tourism officials say the nine-metre object is not the fabled Loch Ness Monster but a prop left over from a 1970 film.

Pair kept on kissing

National
The Associated Press

BILLINGS, Mont.—Nothing can stop true love, or at least a good kiss.

Not even armed robbers.

Police in Montana’s largest city are looking for three suspects who robbed a bar at gunpoint, but they didn’t seem to disturb a couple who kissed through the commotion.

First Nations’ health system flawed: doctor

Health & Wellness
The Canadian Press

OTTAWA—The system used to deliver medical services to First Nations introduces unnecessary barriers to care and often prevents doctors from doing their jobs, an Ontario physician bluntly told a parliamentary committee yesterday.

Dr. Michael Kirlew, a doctor based in Sioux Lookout, Ont., urged the federal government to take “drastic change” to save lives.

Assisted-death bill called ‘shameful’

Health & Wellness
The Canadian Press

OTTAWA—A proposed new federal law that imposes strict conditions on the right of Canadians to end their lives with medical assistance is a betrayal of the woman whose case was central to the Supreme Court’s decision to strike down the ban on assisted death, critics say.

Harper belts first slam

Sports
The Associated Press

WASHINGTON—After connecting for his first grand slam and 100th career home run, Bryce Harper already is thinking ahead to bigger milestones.

His manager is invoking names like Michael Jordan and Wayne Gretzky.

Pair tied for lead

Sports
The Associated Press

HILTON HEAD ISLAND, S.C.—Missing the Masters made Luke Donald’s blood boil.

The former world No. 1 channelled that anger to shoot his best round since January—a five-under 66 at the RBC Heritage yesterday that left the Englishman tied with Branden Grace for the first-round lead.

Casey unhappy with early start time

Sports
The Canadian Press

TORONTO—Dwane Casey said the Toronto Raptors would be ready to play “at six o’clock in the morning” if the schedule so demanded.

But the Raptors’ coach believes his team deserves better.

Microsoft suit is latest tech clash with US over privacy

Technology
By Brandon Bailey The Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO — As we live more of our lives online, the companies we trust with our digital secrets are increasingly clashing with authorities who want access to the messages, pictures, financial records and other data we accumulate in electronic form.

Mississippi governor signs law allowing armed church members

International
By Nassim Benchaabane :The Associated Press

JACKSON, Miss. — Gov. Phil Bryant has signed into law a bill that allows some members of churches to undergo firearms training so they can provide armed security for their congregations.

The Church Protection Act specifies that those designated can carry guns into church buildings. It also allows people to carry holstered weapons without a permit.

Man wrongly convicted in 1957 US murder to be released

International
The Associated Press

SYCAMORE, Ill. — A 76-year-old man who a prosecutor says was wrongly convicted in the abduction and killing of a 7-year-old Illinois schoolgirl in 1957 will be released from prison, a judge ordered Friday.

In 2012, Jack McCullough was convicted for Maria Ridulph’s death, in one of the oldest unsolved U.S. cases ever to go to trial. McCullough was sentenced to life in prison.

Aftershocks, widespread damage after deadly Japan earthquake

International
By Emily Wang The Associated Press

MASHIKI, Japan — Aftershocks rattled communities in southern Japan as businesses and residents got a fuller look Friday at the widespread damage from an unusually strong overnight earthquake that killed nine people and injured about 800.

Problems fixed all over Russia after appeals on Putin’s show

International
By Nataliya Vasilyeva The Associated Press

MOSCOW — In just one day, roads of a Siberian city were repaired, swindled fishery workers got wads of cash and a child prodigy was invited to go to a Crimean summer camp. One thing made it possible: President Vladimir Putin’s Thursday call-in show where distressed Russians brought their problems to the leader.

Seoul, US say North Korean missile launch apparently failed

International
By Foster Klug And Hyung-Jin Kim The Associated Press

SEOUL, Korea, Republic Of — A North Korea missile launch meant to celebrate the birthday of the country’s founder has apparently failed, South Korean and U.S. officials said Friday, an embarrassing setback in what was reportedly the inaugural test of a new, powerful mid-range missile.

Tiger countries agree to preserve big-cat habitats

Science
By Katy Daigle The Associated Press

NEW DELHI — Countries with wild tiger populations have agreed to do more to protect tiger habitats that are shrinking drastically because of deforestation and urban sprawl, conservationists said Friday.