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Jim Cumming - From the Publisher's Pen

Jim is the former publisher of the Fort Frances Times Ltd. He writes a weekly column and can be contacted at jcumming@fortfrances.com

Too many options to mull

Marnie and I began remodelling our kitchen more than a year ago.

Marnie had never liked the dropped ceiling of the brilliant fluorescent fixtures that could light up the whole downstairs. So we agreed to lower the ceiling and put in all new lighting.

It was only the beginning of making several choices from more than a million options.

Safe drinking water is a right

Nightly Canadians are hearing the grim story coming from Flint, Mich., where a city of almost 100,000 people are being poisoned by their water.

The corrosive Flint River water has caused lead from ancient pipes to leach into the drinking water, causing extremely high concentrations of lead in 6,000-12,000 Flint residents—many of them children and teens.

Flint changed its source for drinking water in 2014.

Low loonie not all bad

When I was nine or 10, our Canadian dollar was worth $1.02 compared to the U.S. dollar.

Those two pennies were like gold when you exchanged your dollar into U.S. currency.

During the 1962 election between Progressive Conservative John Diefenbaker and Liberal Lester Pearson, the dollar came under pressure and declined to 92.5 cents vis-a-vis the U.S. greenback.

As an election prop, the “Diefendollar” was created and distributed across Canada. The Conservatives subsequently suffered considerable electoral defeats across Canada.

Time to break out the Long Johns

I haven’t worn long underwear on a regular basis in almost 50 years.

Growing up and playing outside, we didn’t have today’s super-insulated parkas and snow pants. What we had were lined jeans, long underwear, and felt boots that were encased in rubber boots.

We all had toques that kept our heads warm.

When my brother and I started delivering papers in the early 1960s, my mother insisted that we have lined corduroy pants and Stanfield’s wool long johns.

Library serves important role

My mother, who likes to read, was reminiscing Saturday evening about coming to Fort Frances to attend high school.

Up until then, her family had lived in Hudson, Ont., where her father was the stationmaster.

The library in that community back in the early 1940s was a small bookshelf, and my mother explained to my wife and me that she had read every book on it.

But arriving in Fort Frances, she went to the Carnegie-funded library and discovered a whole building filled with books. And at the high school, there was a room filled with books.

Opposite thinking

In two days’ time, we will be into a new year. Having browsed “Facebook,” the thread line of messages being put out by friends is one of hope and well-being for the coming year.

The district is prospering with construction of a new gold mine. Meanwhile, new MP Don Rusnak and Thunder Bay-Atikokan MPP Bill Mauro remain optimistic that steam again will rise from the paper mill in Fort Frances.

Shopping memories

Early Monday morning, I was at the Den getting my ears lowered when Carol and I began reminiscing about the businesses on Scott Street.

I have lots of memories as my cousins lived on First Street and we had the run of Scott Street.

But perhaps my best memories of Scott Street stem back to the Christmas season when my brother and I began shopping for presents on Friday nights when every business was open.

Choices won’t be easy

The world has come together in Paris and reached a goal of limiting global warming to two degrees Celsius.

It is a lofty goal—one not guaranteed by treaties between the 200 nations but rather optimistically hoped for.

The new Trudeau government has set a deadline of 90 days to consult with all provincial governments on how Canada is going to meet the goals set out in the Paris Accord.

We cannot give in to fear

Former U.S. president Franklin Delano Roosevelt, in his first inaugural address, spoke these words: “The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.”

Current U.S. President Barack Obama carried a similar message when he spoke Sunday night from the Oval Office.

“Let’s make sure we never forget what makes us exceptional. Let’s not forget that freedom is more powerful than fear,” he said.

We all must fight pollution

I remember flying into Chicago when I was 16 years old with my father and as the plane began its decent into the airport, we passed through a greenish, yellow zone.

It was a visible air quality issue. The yellow cloud was easy to distinguish.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau went to Paris with the same greenhouse gas emission targets set by former PM Stephen Harper. The difference is that Trudeau is being hailed as a breath of fresh air in global warming.

Along with 149 other leaders, Trudeau is expected to help solve the crisis over global warming.