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Facebook isn’t deleting the fake Pelosi video. Should it?

SAN FRANCISCO — When a doctored video of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi one altered to show the Democratic leader slurring her words began making the rounds on Facebook last week, the social network didn’t take it down. Instead, it “downranked” the video, a behind-the-scenes move intended to limit its spread.

Consumer Reports: Tesla automated lane changes are risky

DETROIT — A new automatic lane-change feature of Tesla’s Autopilot system doesn’t work well and could be a safety risk to drivers, according to tests performed by Consumer Reports.

The magazine and website tested “Navigate on Autopilot” and found it less competent than human drivers, cutting off other cars without leaving enough space.

Can you own an electric car without a home charger?

A popular selling point for electric vehicles is the notion that you never have to stop for gas. Your “gas station” is in your garage simply plug in your vehicle to charge it overnight.

But what if you live in an apartment? Or park somewhere without a plug? How practical is it to own an electric vehicle if you can’t charge it at home?

Tesla gears up for fully self-driving cars amid skepticism

SAN FRANCISCO — Tesla CEO Elon Musk appears poised to transform the company’s electric cars into driverless vehicles in a risky bid to realize a bold vision that he has been floating for years.

The technology required to make that quantum leap is scheduled to be shown off to Tesla investors Monday at the company’s Palo Alto, California, headquarters.

Electric scooters have zipped by docked bikes in popularity

NEW YORK — Love them or hate them, electric scooters are everywhere zipping along city streets and littered on sidewalks, to the dismay of pedestrians and drivers who must share the road.

And now they have overtaken station-based bicycles as the most popular form of shared transportation outside transit and cars in the U.S.

Drones, supercomputers and sonar deployed against floods

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — An arsenal of new technology is being put to the test fighting floods this year as rivers inundate towns and farm fields across the central United States. Drones, supercomputers and sonar that scans deep under water are helping to maintain flood control projects and predict just where rivers will roar out of their banks.