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Blue Jays rough up Phillies

PHILADELPHIA—Marco Estrada has reached the point where he doesn’t need his best stuff to pitch well.

Estrada had another sharp outing, and Edwin Encarnacion and Josh Donaldson hit solo homers, as the Toronto Blue Jays dumped the Philadelphia Phillies 7-2 last night.

Estrada (5-2) allowed two runs and four hits while striking out five in 6 2/3 innings.

Phillies cool off Jays’ bats

TORONTO—After a one-start reprieve, R.A. Dickey went right back to dealing with a lack of run support.

Ryan Howard and Odubel Herrera homered, and Jerad Eickhoff pitched six spotless innings to win consecutive starts for the first time this season, as the Philadelphia Phillies snapped a four-game losing streak by beating Dickey and the Toronto Blue Jays 7-0 last night.

Cavaliers stay alive

OAKLAND, Calif.—Like everyone else, Draymond Green only could watch as LeBron James and Kyrie Irving sent the NBA Finals back to Cleveland.

And it became abundantly clear just how much the Golden State Warriors need their fiery forward after they were buried by Cleveland’s dynamic duo.

Logano helps make history

BROOKLYN, Mich.—Joey Logano plopped into a seat, getting a much-needed break, when the 26-year-old driver found out he was just a part of history.

Logano pulled away from the pack to win the FireKeepers Casino 400 and was followed by 20-year-old Chase Elliott and 23-year-old Kyle Larson—the youngest top three in NASCAR Sprint Cup history.

Berger nabs first title

MEMPHIS, Tenn.—Killing time during a three-hour rain delay yesterday, Phil Mickelson ribbed Daniel Berger about having won the PGA Tour rookie-of-the-year award without a victory.

That was a bit of a sore spot for the ultra-competitive 23-year-old Floridian.

Berger answered once the thunderstorms ended by winning the FedEx St. Jude Classic for his first title.

Tributes pour in for ‘Mr. Hockey’

In a country where hockey is king, Gordie Howe ruled for decades.

A Canadian icon, Howe grew up in the Great Depression playing hockey on prairie ponds—on hand-me-down or jerry-rigged skates.

He went on to become “Mr. Hockey”—a tough and durable customer who could fight as well as he could score.

Howe, who died today at the age of 88, could do it all.