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Astronaut nurses zinnia to full bloom after mould invasion

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. The International Space Station now has a bright pop of orange, thanks to commander Scott Kelly’s green thumb.

Kelly showed off his gardening results; a thriving zinnia with a beautiful orange-yellow bloom over the weekend. He posted photos of the flower on his Twitter account.

“Yes, there are other life forms in space!” Kelly said in a tweet.

Scientists spot brightest supernova yet, outshines Milky Way

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. Astronomers have discovered the brightest star explosion ever, a super supernova that easily outshines our entire Milky Way.

An international team revealed “the most powerful supernova observed in human history” Thursday in the latest Science journal. The astronomers used a network of telescopes around the world to spot the record-breaking supernova last year.

Bones of hunted mammoth show early human presence in Arctic

NEW YORK The remains of a mammoth that was hunted down about 45,000 years ago have revealed the earliest known evidence of humans in the Arctic.

Marks on the bones, found in far northern Russia, indicate the creature was stabbed and butchered. The tip of a tusk was damaged in a way that suggests human activity, perhaps to make ivory tools.

The Food and Drug Administration says a potato genetically engineered to resist the pathogen that caused the Irish potato famine

BOISE, Idaho The Food and Drug Administration says a potato genetically engineered to resist the pathogen that caused the Irish potato famine is as safe as any other potato on the market.

Scientists on trail of superbug gene

TORONTO—The discovery that a gene which turns some bacteria into antibiotic-resistant superbugs has been in Canada for at least five years has scientists wondering when it first emerged and how to stop its spread.

The MCR-1 gene makes E. coli and some other species of bacteria resistant to colistin—an antibiotic considered the drug of last resort for some diseases.