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Recipes

Shredded Sweet Potatoes for Passover or Easter side dish

With spring just down the road, you’ve likely already figured out the main dish for the feast accompanying whichever of the two big seasonal holidays ‚Äî Easter or Passover ‚Äî you celebrate. Leg of lamb and glazed ham are Easter favourites. Braised brisket or roast chicken land on many Passover tables.

These stuffed tomatoes are a nice update to old pepper ones

Does your meatless Monday game need an overhaul?

As a meat-eater myself, I find that the trick to meatless meal-making is to have a small repertoire of recipes that can work as a side dish or first course, or be eaten in larger quantities as a vegetarian main dish. This is the same strategy I use when hosting a vegetarian in my home.

Silky Leek Soup

No matter how many dazzling things we have the good fortune to eat in our lives, we often remember the simplest meals with as much power and affection as the fanciest. A humble, pureed vegetable soup is among those particular pleasures. Also, Proustian prose aside, if you’re feeling lazy, you can get from a few ingredients to deliciousness in no time.

Onion Beer Bread is a crowd- pleaser

A larger-than-usual crowd meeting up at your house for dinner? This Onion Beer Bread would add a lot to the menu. It’s delicious, of course, but it’s also very easy to whip up. Unlike more conventional breads, this one doesn’t involve yeast or require multiple risings. And except for the rosemary, you probably have all the ingredients in the house.

Can a healthier angel food cake still have flavour? Sure.

Is there anything dreamier than the tender crumb of a light-as-air angel food cake? I’ve loved angel food cake ever since I first tasted it as a child. It reminded me of cotton candy. No wonder: angel food cake is essentially a fluffy blend of a super-sugary meringue laced with just enough flour to give it a little structure.

Slow-Cooked Pork Roast

Slowly cooking a big hunk of tough, inexpensive meat isn’t just the best way to cook this cut of meat. It’s really the only way.

Most tough cuts of meat come from the hardest working parts of the animal, and therefore have a lot of collagen. This collagen needs to be broken down and converted to gelatin for the meat to become tender, and that is accomplished by low and slow cooking.