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Lifestyles

Life expectancy in Canada could follow falling trend in U.S.

TORONTO—A paper published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal suggests life expectancy in Canada could be threatened by the same factors that are causing it to fall in the United States.

“There are some signs which are pointing in the same direction,” said Juergen Rehm of Toronto's Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, a large teaching and research hospital.

'Unimaginable destruction' from Hurricane Michael

PANAMA CITY, Fla.—Search-and-rescue teams fanned out across the Florida Panhandle to reach trapped people in Michael's wake today as daylight yielded scenes of rows upon rows of houses smashed to pieces by the third-most powerful hurricane on record to hit the continental U.S.

At least two deaths were blamed on Michael—and it wasn't done yet.

Poll: Teens say social media makes them feel better

NEW YORK — Today’s teens are always on their smartphones, many check social media “constantly” and prefer texting over face-to-face communication.

But a new poll finds that these same teens also say that social media has a positive effect on their lives, helping them feel more confident, less lonely and less depressed.

From penny press to Snapchat: Parents fret through the ages

NEW YORK — When Stephen Dennis was raising his two sons in the 1980s, he never heard the phrase “screen time,” nor did he worry much about the hours his kids spent with technology. When he bought an Apple II Plus computer, he considered it an investment in their future and encouraged them to use it as much as possible.

’Widespread’ seafood mislabelling at retailers, restaurants, study finds

When consumers buy butterfish or white tuna at a grocery store they may instead receive a fish dubbed “the laxative of the sea,” according to an investigation into seafood fraud that found nearly half of seafood samples it tested at Canadian grocery stores and restaurants were wrongly labelled.

Mind-altering breast milk detected in study

CHICAGO—Marijuana's main mind-altering ingredient was detected in nursing mothers' breast milk in a small study that comes amid evidence that more U.S. women are using pot during pregnancy and afterward.

Experts say the ingredient, THC, has chemical properties that could allow it to disrupt brain development and potentially cause harm, although solid evidence of that is lacking.