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Lifestyles

What consumers can do as regulators weigh risks of compounds in products

WASHINGTON —At first, Tomas Monarrez didn't notice the labels when he went shopping for pots and pans.

'Completely toxin free!" said a big green message on a line of nonstick frying pans in the cookware aisle at a store in the nation's capital.

“No PFOA!" boasted the label on a 12-piece kitchen set. "Will never release any toxic fumes,” another label promised.

Study links processed food to chronic disease

OTTAWA—New research from the University of Montreal links diets high in ultra-processed foods including carbonated drinks, mass-produced cookies and ice cream, and sweetened yogurts to chronic disease.

The research was based on Statistics Canada data from a 2015 survey that found ultra-processed foods accounted for an average of 47 percent of daily calories consumed by adults.

Shortening trainee doctor hours hasn’t harmed patients

When reforms shortened working hours for U.S. doctors-in-training, some worried: Was that enough time to learn the art of medicine? Would future patients suffer?

Now a study has answers, finding no difference in hospital deaths, readmissions or costs when comparing results from doctors trained before and after caps limiting duties to 80 hours per week took effect.