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Health & Wellness

More US kids in foster care; parental drug abuse a factor

NEW YORK — The number of children in the U.S. foster care system has increased for the fourth year in a row, with substance abuse by parents a major factor, according to new federal data released on Thursday.

The annual report from the Department of Health and Human Services counted 437,500 children in foster care as of Sept. 30, 2016, up from about 427,400 a year earlier.

Rise in teen suicide, social media coincide; is there link?

CHICAGO — An increase in suicide rates among U.S. teens occurred at the same time social media use surged and a new analysis suggests there may be a link.

Suicide rates for teens rose between 2010 and 2015 after they had declined for nearly two decades, according to data from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Why the rates went up isn’t known.

Study suggests women less likely to get CPR from bystanders

ANAHEIM, Calif. — Women are less likely than men to get CPR from a bystander and more likely to die, a new study suggests, and researchers think reluctance to touch a woman’s chest might be one reason.

Only 39 per cent of women suffering cardiac arrest in a public place were given CPR versus 45 per cent of men, and men were 23 per cent more likely to survive, the study found.

Half of US adults have high blood pressure in new guidelines

ANAHEIM, Calif. — New guidelines lower the threshold for high blood pressure, adding 30 million Americans to those who have the condition, which now plagues nearly half of U.S. adults.

High pressure, which for decades has been a top reading of at least 140 or a bottom one of 90, drops to 130 over 80 in advice announced Monday by a dozen medical groups.

Study suggests women less likely to get CPR from bystanders

ANAHEIM, Calif. — Women are less likely than men to get CPR from a bystander and more likely to die, a new study suggests, and researchers think reluctance to touch a woman’s chest might be one reason.

Only 39 per cent of women suffering cardiac arrest in a public place were given CPR versus 45 per cent of men, and men were 23 per cent more likely to survive, the study found.

Trump calls attackers ‘deranged’ but mental health link weak

CHICAGO — President Donald Trump called the Texas church shootings gunman “deranged,” the New York bike path attacker “a very sick and deranged person,” and the Las Vegas massacre shooter “a sick, demented man.”

It’s a common reaction to mass violence who in their right mind would commit these senseless crimes? The truth is more nuanced.