Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Health & Wellness

Stem-cell transplant eases symptoms of rare ‘stiff person syndrome’: study

TORONTO — Canadian doctors have begun using stem cell transplants to treat “stiff person syndrome,” a rare neurological condition in which a patient’s leg and other muscles suddenly contract painfully, often leaving them immobilized like a tin soldier.

Best polio vaccine? Oral and injectable, used in tandem, new study says

TORONTO — For decades scientists have debated whether injectable or oral polio vaccine is the best option for trying to finish the job of eradicating polio. Now a new study offers an answer: both.

End-of-life care must be priority

OTTAWA—Doctors tackled the delicate question of medically assisted death on Tuesday at a session devoted to end-of-life care at the annual conference of the Canadian Medical Association.
Long lines of physicians queued up to share their opinions on how end-of-life conditions for ailing Canadians must change as the population ages.

Aid group: American who had Ebola has recovered; hospital to discuss both patients’ discharge

ATLANTA — At least one of the two American aid workers who were infected with the Ebola virus was to be discharged Thursday from an Atlanta hospital, a spokeswoman for the aid group he was working for said.
Meanwhile, Emory University Hospital planned to hold a news conference Thursday morning to discuss both patients’ discharge.

Doctors debate end-of-life care at Canadian Medical Association meeting

OTTAWA — Doctors tackled the delicate question of medically assisted death on Tuesday at a session devoted to end-of-life care at the annual conference of the Canadian Medical Association.
Long lines of physicians queued up to share their opinions on how end-of-life conditions for ailing Canadians must change as the population ages.

Feds slapping stronger warning labels on opioids

OTTAWA—The federal government is putting stronger warning labels on extended-release painkillers like OxyContin in an effort to prevent the abuse of opioids.
“Too many people are abusing prescription drugs,” Health Minister Rona Ambrose told the annual conference of the Canadian Medical Association today.
“Too many people are suffering and dying as a result.”

Baby born inside car

ST.CATHARINES, Ont.—Provincial police say a woman has given birth in a car next to a southern Ontario highway.
They said it happened on the side of Highway 406 in St. Catharines just after 8 a.m.
Police noted the woman’s husband was at the wheel when they were forced to pull over so she could have the baby.
The OPP said both the 26-year-old mother and her son are all right.

Studies suggest guidelines advocating lower salt intake may need shaking up

TORONTO — A pair of large international studies are questioning the validity of the notion that the less salt a person consumes, the better. In fact, the Canadian-led research suggests too little salt in the diet may even be a bad thing.

Raw milk farmer loses bid

OTTAWA—The Supreme Court of Canada will not hear an appeal from an Ontario farmer who has long championed the right to sell and drink unpasteurized milk, but he says “it’s not the end of the road.”

Study of passengers from Air Transat near-disaster aids understanding of PTSD

TORONTO — Thirteen years ago next week marks what could have been a grim anniversary: Air Transat Flight 236, bound to Lisbon from Toronto, crash-landed on an island in the Azores off Portugal after running out of fuel over the Atlantic.

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