Thursday, July 2, 2015

Health & Wellness

National cord-blood bank will provide stem cells to treat host of diseases

TORONTO — Canadian Blood Services officially launched a national public cord-blood bank Thursday, with the goal of collecting and preserving samples that reflect the country’s broad ethnic diversity.

More than 35,000 athletes, $20 million goes to groundbreaking study of concussions

More than 35,000 college athletes and cadets at U.S. service academies are helping researchers write a new, extensive and groundbreaking chapter in the study and tracking of concussions.

Should you be told if trainees are involved in your surgery? Doctor argues yes

TORONTO — A commentary in a prominent medical journal says patients ought to be told when doctors-in-training are going to play an active role in their surgeries.
Author Dr. Chryssa McAlister says some supervising doctors are very good about telling patients how active trainees will be during their procedure.
But she says others are not as forthcoming.

Brain scans of passengers on near-disastrous Air Transat flight studied

TORONTO — Brain scans of passengers who believed they were about to die when their plane ran out of fuel over the Atlantic in 2001 are helping researchers better understand traumatic memories.

Follow-up imaging tests unneeded: study

TORONTO—Women with early-stage breast cancer are getting unneeded follow-up imaging tests which are clogging the health-care system and wasting millions of dollars, a new study reports.
Canadian and international guidelines say most women diagnosed with Stage 1 or Stage 2 breast cancer don’t need additional MRIs or CT scans because the risk that their cancer has spread is very low.

Doctors warn against dangers of skinny jeans after woman becomes fashion victim: Don’t squat

LONDON — Attention wearers of skinny jeans: don’t squat — at least not for long.
Doctors in Australia report that a 35-year-old woman was hospitalized for four days after experiencing muscle damage, swelling, and nerve blockages in her legs after squatting for several hours while wearing tight-fitting denims.

Early stage breast cancer patients getting too many imaging tests: study

TORONTO — Women with early stage breast cancer are getting unneeded follow-up imaging tests which are clogging the health-care system and wasting millions of dollars, a new study reports.
Canadian and international guidelines say that most women diagnosed with Stage 1 or Stage 2 breast cancer don’t need additional MRIs or CT scans because the risk that their cancer has spread is very low.

Concern raised over two-stage allergic reaction

TORONTO—A new study suggests about 15 percent of children who have a severe allergic reaction that involves anaphylaxis actually can have a second reaction hours after the first.
It warns that doctors and parents should be on the lookout for this type of two-stage, or biphasic, anaphylactic reaction.

15 per cent of kids who have an anaphylactic reaction have delayed 2nd reaction

TORONTO — A new study suggests about 15 per cent of children who have a severe allergic reaction that involves anaphylaxis can actually have a second reaction hours after the first.
It warns that doctors and parents should be on the lookout for this type of two-stage or biphasic anaphylactic reaction.

Trial of Tekmira’s Ebola drug stopped; no overall benefit shown from TKM-Ebola

TORONTO — A clinical trial of what was once thought to be one of the brightest hopes for an Ebola drug has been halted after an interim assessment concluded there was no sign the experimental product was offering overall benefit.
Tekmira Pharmaceuticals announced Friday that the Phase 2 trial of its TKM-Ebola drug had been stopped in Sierra Leone. The announcement leaves the drug in limbo.

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