Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Business

Saskatoons or Juneberries? Name debate brewing between Canada and U.S.

REGINA — A food fight of sorts could be growing between Canada and the United States over a tiny berry.
A U.S. researcher with the Cornell University Co-operative Extension is suggesting Canadians use the name Juneberries when selling Saskatoons south of the border.
The Saskatoon berry, which mostly grows on the Prairies, looks similar to a blueberry but is considered more nutritious.

Tim Hortons and Burger King to join forces to form a new company

OAKVILLE, Ont. — Miami-based Burger King is buying Canada’s iconic coffee chain Tim Hortons for about US$11-billion in a deal that will allow the two fast food companies to operate as independent brands.
The companies say the transaction will create a new company that will form the world’s third-largest quick service restaurant company.

Families of victims in recent airline crashes could seek compensation above normal limits

Families of passengers who were on the Malaysia Airlines plane shot down over Ukraine are starting to sort through the long process of gaining compensation for their loss.
Officials in the Netherlands, where the majority of Flight 17 victims lived, say that Malaysia Airlines has been making $50,000 payments to the families without admitting any wrongdoing in the crash.

Burger King in talks to buy Tim Hortons, creating new publicly listed company based in Canada

MIAMI — Burger King is in talks to buy Tim Hortons in hopes of creating a new, publicly traded company with its headquarters in Canada.
With a new base in Canada, Burger King, now based in Miami, could shave its U.S. tax bill. Tax inversions have become increasingly popular among U.S. companies trying to cut costs.

Greenpeace says defamation lawsuit an attempt to muzzle criticism

THUNDER BAY, Ont. — An environmental group has filed court documents saying a lawsuit against it is an attempt to silence its criticism of a forestry company’s harvesting practices.

Fitch affirms Canada’s AAA credit rating, but points to economic headwinds

NEW YORK — Fitch Ratings has affirmed Canada’s triple-A credit rating and says the outlook is stable.
The New York-based global ratings agency, in a report issued Tuesday, said its assessment was based, among other factors, on Canada’s political stability and track record of prudent fiscal management.

Tooth fairy pays a premium for baby teeth in the Maritimes, skips Quebec

TORONTO — If you’re a kid in Atlantic Canada, here’s a reason to smile. According to a new survey, the tooth fairy is paying a premium for baby teeth in the Maritimes and Newfoundland.
At $3.46 a tooth, it’s 19 per cent higher than the national average of $2.80.

Ontario could make more money, see lower prices by ending booze monopoly: study

TORONTO — Ontario could reap more money from booze sales and consumers could pay less for alcohol if the provincial government opened up the business to more retailers, a new report found.
The study, released Wednesday by the C.D. Howe Institute, said the government is actually foregoing revenue by preserving its virtual monopoly on the sale of alcohol.

Google looking to extend its empire

SAN FRANCISCO—Google’s IPO, a decade ago this week, launched the company on a trajectory that continues to reshape its business and much of the world in its orbit.
And CEO Larry Page is determined to push even further.

Google parlays IPO to extend its empire far beyond Internet search during past 10 years

SAN FRANCISCO — Google’s IPO, a decade ago this week, launched the company on a trajectory that continues to reshape its business and much of the world in its orbit.
And CEO Larry Page is determined to push even further.

Syndicate content