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Fort Frances Times Online Edition - August 25, 2015

Storage shelter

Photos
By Duane Hicks

The town now has a salt and sand storage structure at the Public Works yard. The $500,000 structure, built by Van Pelt Construction Inc., is nearly complete, with the town still to add some finishing touches. The massive building will allow the town to store salt, along with mixed salt and sand, to be used on roads in the winter.

Elections office

Photos
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Bob Dakin, additional assistant returning officer, got his work day underway this morning at the Elections Canada office located in the Rainy Lake Plaza on King’s Highway here. The office, which provides information on voting or registering residents to vote, currently is open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. But its hours will be extended after Labour Day.

Barn concert

Photos
Sarah Marusyk

Toronto folk quintet “Union Duke” totally rocked the barn at Cornell Farms in La Vallee last night after local musicians Kenneth Kellar and Ben Sletmoen had opened for band. The well-attended show marked the final barn concert of the summer.

Heading for home

Photos
Joey Payeur

Trish Smith of the Northwest Bay Beavers rounded third base to score on Val Smith’s two-run single in the second inning of Game 2 of the Rainy River District Women’s Fastball League final yesterday evening. The Beavers went on to a 21-17 win over the two-time defending champion Red Gut Babes to give Northwest Bay its first-ever league title.

‘Big Easy’ theme of chili cook-off

News
Duane Hicks

The Fort Frances Chamber of Commerce is looking for chefs to compete in its annual chili cook-off next month, which this year will follow theme, “New Orleans Chili Gras.”

“It should be good,” said Chamber executive director Jennifer Soderholm.

“[The theme] opens it up to all kinds of new spices and meats even,” she noted.

Japanese man to reunite with boat

National
The Canadian Press

KLEMTU, B.C.—A Japanese fisherman is to be reunited with his boat more than four years after a powerful tsunami hit his country and carried the craft to the shores of British Columbia.

Kou Sasaki arrived in Vancouver yesterday and later this week will be heading to the coastal village of Klemtu, where his vessel washed up in the spring of 2013.

Continuing education on opioid prescribing should be mandatory

National
Sheryl Ubelacker
The Canadian Press

Canadian physicians should be subject to mandatory continuing medical education in the appropriate prescribing of opioids—medications whose use now has become almost routine for treating chronic pain, the Canadian Medical Association’s annual meeting in Halifax was told yesterday.

Catholic teachers reach agreement

National
The Canadian Press

TORONTO—The Ontario English Catholic Teachers’ Association is now the second big teachers’ union to reach a tentative contract agreement with school boards in the past week.

No details of the deal reached this morning have been released, but the union immediately suspended a work-to-rule campaign during the ratification period.

Province, chiefs ink political accord

National
Keith Leslie
The Canadian Press

TORONTO—The Ontario government yesterday signed a political accord with the Chiefs of Ontario that Premier Kathleen Wynne said will guide relations between First Nations and the province.

“As we’ve seen time and time again, when this relationship is not respected or when the trust is broken, the consequences are painful and long-lasting,” said Wynne.

Driver dies of injury

National
Jenna Fryer
The Associated Press

Justin Wilson was seriously injured in IndyCar crashes twice in a two-year span.

Both times, the veteran driver returned to competition unwavering in his love for the sport and his acceptance of the risks.

Continuing education on opioid prescribing should be mandatory, doctors told

Health & Wellness
By Sheryl Ubelacker THE CANADIAN PRESS

Canadian physicians should be subject to mandatory continuing medical education in the appropriate prescribing of opioids — medications whose use has now become almost routine for treating chronic pain, the Canadian Medical Association’s annual meeting in Halifax was told Monday.

Packers lose Nelson for season

Sports
The Associated Press

The Green Bay Packers’ worst fears about the severity of receiver Jordy Nelson’s knee injury have come true.

The team said yesterday only that the star receiver suffered a “significant right knee injury” that would cost him the season.

Nelson, one of the top targets for NFL MVP quarterback Aaron Rodgers, was injured Sunday in a pre-season game at Pittsburgh.

Yankees back tied with Jays

Sports
The Associated Press

NEW YORK—If the N.Y. Yankees indeed have lost CC Sabathia for the rest of the season, they might have found a reluctant leader in Nathan Eovaldi.

Eovaldi matched Scott Feldman with eight overpowering innings before Carlos Beltran had a game-winning sacrifice fly in a wild ninth to lift New York over the Houston Astros 1-0 last night.

Mets widen lead

Sports
The Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA—David Wright’s return sparked a home run derby last night.

Wright hit a long homer on his first major-league swing in 133 days, and Wilmer Flores went deep twice, as the N.Y. Mets set a franchise record with eight long balls in a 16-7 victory over the Philadelphia Phillies.

IndyCar driver Justin Wilson dies of head injury suffered at Pocono

Sports
By Jenna Fryer THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

IndyCar driver Justin Wilson died Monday night from a head injury suffered when a piece of debris struck him at Pocono Raceway. He was 37.

IndyCar made the announcement at Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

Islamic State propaganda images purport to show destruction of Syrian temple at Palmyra

International
By Sarah El Deeb THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BEIRUT — The Islamic State group released propaganda images Tuesday that purport to show militants laying explosives in and then blowing up the 2,000-year-old temple of Baalshamin in Syria’s ancient caravan city of Palmyra.

After marathon talks, rival Koreas reach deal over mine blast and propaganda broadcasts

International
By Hyung-Jin Kim And Foster Klug THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEOUL, South Korea — After 40-plus-hours of talks, North and South Korea on Tuesday pulled back from the brink with an accord that allows both sides to save face and, for the moment, avert the bloodshed they’ve been threatening each other with for weeks.