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Kim Jo Bliss - Moo's From The Herd

Frosty mornings hard on crops

We can hope our frosty mornings are long gone now until later this fall, but you just never know!

This is hard on the newly-emerged crops that are trying so hard to pop out of the ground. I certainly hope there is little damage as it is frustrating and expensive to think about re-seeding acres and acres.

We are hoping we’ll get our soybeans and dry beans planted this week. We normally like to wait until after the middle of May to plant these crops so we are somewhat on schedule with them.

Things a bit slow at EARS

Well, if the weather channels are correct, we are in for the wetter, cooler weather that I was dreading.

I realize a rain shower wouldn’t hurt anything and, in fact, improve the situation with our fire ban. But we don’t need inches and inches of the wet stuff.

Likely some of the early-seeded crops could use a sprinkle of rain, but it would be nice if they didn’t get drowned out or froze off!

We certainly hope the rain will reach those horrible forest fires that others are battling.

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Most anxious to get planting

The sun finally has arrived—and everyone is anxious to get on the land and get some seed into the ground.

I was able to start cultivating Friday. And it was great for the most part!

My summer students are starting this week at the Emo Agricultural Research Station—and they are going to get tossed into a very busy time! I was hoping to get back into the station over the weekend but that just didn’t work out.

I know many think it is too early to be planting, but the black soil is quite warm and we all worry about what will happen with our weather.

Cattle prices have dropped

We ended up with 1,246 animals at the Stratton sales barn on Saturday, with the value in sales being $1,350,931.77.

Unfortunately, prices have dropped and all indications are they will be staying this way for a long time.

People selling their own yearlings or fall calves did OK, but the difficult part are those who purchased cattle last fall at the top of the market and now are having difficulty getting their money back out of them.

I do sympathize with them. The cattle business is tough and it is hard seeing people losing big bucks.

Grass starting to green up finally

You certainly could see the grass greening up as the temperature reached double digits on Saturday!

I was excited about seeing the lawn–and then thought, oh yeah, that’s the next thing: cutting grass!

I still have a few large rocks to move before that first time on the lawn mower. The first time is scary as you uncover and throw around all those hidden winter treasures.

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Being sick killed all my big plans

And so winter hangs on although I’m hearing that we’re supposed to be in double-digit temperatures for daytime highs by week’s end.

Won’t that be something!

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Well, I ended up sick again last week and missed out on all my big plans. I understand we had a great turnout at the work bee at the Stratton sales barn on Saturday.

Thanks to all of you who made it.

Snow was no joke

Well, April seems to have come in like a Lion!

And how about that snow on Friday–quite the April Fool’s Day prank but it seems to want to continue, with more white stuff in the forecast this week.

We can’t complain about the yard being sloppy since it is frozen solid (although the animals might complain because all this frozen mud is hard on their feet).

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We will gather at the Stratton sales barn this Saturday around 9 a.m. for our first work bee of the season.

We welcome everyone to come out for a few hours and see how much we can get finished.

Twin calves a surprise

I was surprised with a set of twins on Friday night.

Normally you see twins from your cows calving at the beginning of your cycle, but I was lucky to get a heifer and bull from a young cow at the end of it.

The heifer calf weighed 75 pounds and the bull 70 pounds, so that is a pretty decent weight for her to be carrying around.

But she is a good momma so she should be able to raise them just fine.

When you end up with a heifer and bull twin, a lot of the times the heifer is infertile so she not likely get to stay in the herd.

Spring is my least favourite season

I’m crossing my fingers that we don’t get the amount of rain they’re currently predicting on my weather apps.

Thankfully there is still some frost so when you are feeding cows, you are not sinking out of sight—but that will happen soon enough.

I understand it is going to cool down again, and I don’t think many will argue the freezing at night will help dry up some of the mess we are dealing with currently.

Waiting for last cows to calve

I’m sure no one is complaining about these spring-like days and I’m not, either, except I worry that we will pay for it later–when we truly should be getting the spring-like days.

Though I wasn’t born for the “Spring of ’66,” I’ve heard many times about the amount of snow that arrived in March of that year.

Our neighbours to the east in Temiskaming District have a tremendous amount of snow and a friend of mine had a 14-month-old dairy barn that collapsed with the snow load.