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By Jill Lawless The Associated Press

To get UK passport, Meghan needs time, money, a good memory

LONDON — How tall is the London Eye? Who opened Britain’s first Indian restaurant? Who was the fifth wife of Henry VIII?

If Meghan Markle doesn’t already know the answers, she needs to start studying.

All three are potential questions on a test given to those who like Prince Harry’s fiancee want to become British citizens.

Improvised bomb injures 22 on London subway train

LONDON — A homemade bomb exploded on a packed London subway train during rush hour on Friday, leaving 22 people injured, police and health officials said. None of the injured is thought to be seriously hurt.

Police say the explosion was a terrorist attack, the fifth in Britain this year. Britain’s domestic spy agency is helping out in the investigation.

It’s over: Britain files for divorce from the European Union

LONDON — The United Kingdom filed for divorce from the European Union on Wednesday, overturning four decades of integration with its neighbours, demolishing the notion that EU expansion is inevitable and shaking the foundations of a bloc that is facing challenges to its identity and its place in the world.

Are high heel dress codes sexist? UK lawmakers hold debate

LONDON — British lawmakers focused on footwear Monday, asking whether employers should be able to make women wear high heels as part of a corporate dress code.

Members of Parliament were to debate a ban on mandatory workplace high heels, in response to a petition started by a receptionist who was sent home without pay for wearing flat shoes.

London Zoo calls gorilla escape ‘minor’; others see risks

London Zoo said Friday that a silverback gorilla’s escape from its enclosure was a “minor incident” that posed no danger to the public ‚Äî but animal rights activists are demanding an official, independent investigation.

A wildlife advocacy group said the incident, which ended without injuries to visitors or the animal, could have had a more tragic outcome.

UK judge: Putin probably approved plan to poison ex-spy

LONDON President Vladimir Putin probably approved a plan by Russia’s FSB security service to kill a former agent-turned-Kremlin critic who died after drinking tea laced with radioactive poison, a British judge said Thursday in a strongly worded report that led Moscow to accuse Britain of souring bilateral relations.