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The Associated Press

Ozone hole swells

GENEVA—The Antarctic ozone hole has swelled this month to one of its biggest sizes on record, U.N. and U.S. scientists say.

They insist the Earth-shielding ozone layer remains on track to long-term recovery but residents of the southern hemisphere should be on watch for high UV levels in the weeks ahead.

Pennies turn into windfall

RUSTON, La.—After more than 45 years of saving pennies, a Louisiana man decided it was time to cash them in.

The News-Star reports 73-year-old Otha Anders, of Ruston, took 15 five-gallon plastic water jugs full of the coins to the bank on Tuesday.

His grand total: a deposit of $5,136.14 into his account.

He says it will go toward a recent dental bill.

Man makes more than a pretty penny - $5,136.14, to be exact - cashing in his jugs of the coins

RUSTON, La. After more than 45 years of saving pennies, a Louisiana man decided it was time to cash them in.

The News-Star reports that 73-year-old Otha Anders, of Ruston, took 15 five-gallon plastic water jugs full of the coins to the bank on Tuesday. His grand total: A deposit of $5,136.14 into his account. He says it will go toward a recent dental bill.

UN weather body: Antarctic ozone hole expands due to cold

GENEVA The U.N.’s weather body says unusually cold high-altitude conditions have expanded the Antarctic ozone hole to one of the largest sizes on record, though the long-term trend remains one of shrinkage.

The World Meteorological Organizations notes regular, year-to-year variations in the hole, but says the expansion shows “we need to remain vigilant.”

Already home to a mall ski hill, United Arab Emirates also may become the home of a snow park

ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates Already home to a ski hill inside a mall, the sunbaked deserts of the United Arab Emirates soon may be home to a snow park too.

Officials with Abu Dhabi’s Reem Mall, scheduled to open in 2018, say they plan to build a 125,000-square-foot (11,600-square-meter) snow park inside the mall.

Mets, Royals personalize lucky gloves

KANSAS CITY, Mo.—Royals’ reliever Ryan Madson was in a real jam.

Standing on the mound, he realized he had the wrong glove.

He meant to wear a mitt with son Luke’s name stitched on the thumb. Instead, this one said “Sean”—the boy’s younger brother.

“It threw me,” Madson said. “I didn’t know what to do.”

Then a funny thing happened.