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The Associated Press

Anthem snub nets fine

ZURICH, Switzerland—The Russian Hockey Federation was fined today over the national team snubbing Canada’s victory celebrations after the world championship final.

The sport’s governing body, IIHF, said the Russian players deliberately left the ice before Canada’s national anthem was played after a signal from captain Ilya Kovalchuk.

Longest tamale made

BELEN, N.M.—A group of people in New Mexico say they cooked the world’s longest tamale Saturday morning.

Luis Hernandez, of the ABQ West Chamber of Commerce, said a team of more than 30 chefs at Viva II, a three-day celebration of the state’s heritage, assembled a 116-foot, seven-inch long tamale at the Valencia County fairgrounds in Belen.

Second-straight Bristol win for Logano

BRISTOL, Tenn.—As Joey Logano circled Bristol Motor Speedway, he’d briefly glance in the mirror to watch Kevin Harvick.

Logano had taken the lead on a restart with 64 laps to go but Harvick was closing in by using a completely different line.

Refusing to get rattled, Logano stuck to what worked for him Saturday and won the Bristol night race for the second-straight year.

Love III third-oldest to win

GREENSBORO, N.C.—During their practice round together before the Wyndham Championship, Tiger Woods pumped local favourite Davis Love III for tips on how to play the course.

Looks like Love saved a few secrets for himself.

Love became the third-oldest winner in PGA Tour history with his victory yesterday while Woods’ season came to an abrupt end.

New Mexico festival assembled record-breaking 116-foot tamale in Belen

BELEN, N.M. — A group of people in New Mexico say they cooked the world’s longest tamale Saturday morning.

Luis Hernandez of the ABQ West Chamber of Commerce says that a team of more than 30 chefs at Viva II, a three-day celebration of the state’s heritage, assembled a 116-foot. 7-inch long tamale at the Valencia County fairgrounds in Belen.

Prosecutors: Teens rescued from forced-labour situation in Ohio were taken from US custody

MARION, Ohio — The thousand-mile journey to the Texas border was supposed to bring the Guatemalan teenagers to a better life. Instead, it was the beginning of a terrible ordeal: prosecutors say they were fraudulently plucked from U.S. custody by conspirators posing as friends or family who forced them to work as virtual slaves.