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By Aleksandra Sagan The Canadian Press

Pea-based pants may be next frontier as Lululemon looks at crops for clothes

VANCOUVER — Lululemon Athletica Inc. wants customers to have more pea in their yoga pants.

The athleisure retailer presented the idea at Protein Industries Canada’s (PIC) pitch day Monday in a talk titled: Clothing the World with Crops, according to a photo of a PowerPoint slide.

Craft brewers eager for corner store sales

Ontario craft breweries are welcoming the provincial government’s move to expand beer sales to corner stores, saying the current system limits their products’ exposure to customers.

“I just think it’s fantastic news,” said Scott Simmons, president of the Ontario Craft Brewers, a trade association composed of nearly 100 brewer members.

Robot servers and 3D menus: What’s on tap at the restaurant of the future

Patrons enter a cafe and pass by a hologram of coffee pouring from a carafe into a cup. They scroll through a three-dimensional menu and see exactly what each dish will look like to help them decide what to order. A small robot, arms fixed to a tray, delivers the meal to the table and says “Your food is here.”

’Recall fatigue’ may prompt Canadians to avoid serving some foods over holidays

VANCOUVER — A string of high-profile produce recalls may lead to shortages of the most recent culprits ahead of the holidays. But, even if cauliflower and some lettuce varieties stay in stock, experts say consumers may be hesitant to buy and serve them as part of a big, family meal.

New NAFTA deal unlikely to push dairy aisle prices lower, experts say

Canadians hoping their weekly grocery staples like milk and eggs may soon cost less thanks to a new trade deal that opens up Canada’s dairy industry may be out of luck. Experts say the trilateral agreement between Canada, the U.S. and Mexico is unlikely to bring prices down, but could leave shoppers with more choices in the dairy aisle.