July 6, 1944

Torture Victim Dies


Mrs. Viola Jamieson of Flanders, died Sunday morning at ten o 'clock as a result of burns allegedly to have been inflicted when, according to her statement, three ruffians entered her home Saturday evening, June 10, unable to get money from her, placed the tiny woman on a hot stove, resulting in 30 per cent burns to the arms, legs, back, and chest.
She was immediately brought to the LaVerendrye hospital on a freight train caboose as soon as the Canadian National Railway officials learned of the seriousness of her condition.
Three men were said to have thrown a sheet over her head when she entered the house and when she refused to tell them where the money was kept, the assailants are said to have set her papers on fire and burned her arms and later set her body on a hot stove burning her body both front and back, and also burned her hands on the stove to force her tell them where she kept her money.
After burning her terribly on of the trio suggested that they " see how much water she could stand," Mrs. Jamieson related in describing the terrible treatment she was forced to undergo. However on of the men said "no" and she was thrown into the root cellar where two of her boys, aged 10 and 12 had already been imprisoned.
One of the children dug his way through the earth roof of the roothouse and ran approximately a mile to Flanders station where police were notified.
Residents of Flanders were immediately rushed to the rescue of Mrs. Jamieson and administered first aid.
Following her death, Provincial Police who have been conducting an intensive investigation since the alleged crime was committed, have posted a $1,000 reward for information leading to the conviction of the culprits. Special investigators have been assigned to duty by the Department at Queen's Park.
Funeral Services for the late Mrs. Viole Jamieson who died Sunday morning at LaVerendrye hospital, were held from St. Mary's church, Wednesday, July 5, at 9:00 a.m. Reverend Fe. Beaudin officiated and burial took place in the Fort Frances cemetery.
The deceased had been a resident of Flanders for the past 20 years. Surviving her death is her husband, James, of Kapuskasing, Ontario; three daughters, Mrs. Bernice Casnig, Irene and Tillie of Fort Frances; and six sons, Pte. Harley Jamieson and Pte. Francis Jamieson in England, Miner of the U.S. Navy, Bernard of Pickle Crowe, Ontario, and Harold and Arthur of Fort Frances.

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